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    Poland The Three Partitions, 1764-95
    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/poland/poland_history_the_three_partitions_1764_95.html
    Source: The Library of Congress Country Studies
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    During the reign of Empress Catherine the Great (1762-96), Russia intensified its manipulation in Polish affairs. Prussia and Austria, the other powers surrounding the republic, also took advantage of internal religious and political bickering to divide up the country in three partition stages. The third partition in 1795 wiped Poland-Lithuania from the map of Europe.

    First Partition

    In 1764 Catherine dictated the election of her former favorite, Stanislaw August Poniatowski, as king of PolandLithuania . Confounding expectations that he would be an obedient servant of his mistress, Stanislaw August encouraged the modernization of his realm's ramshackle political system and achieved a temporary moratorium on use of the individual veto in the Sejm (1764-66). This turnabout threatened to renew the strength of the monarchy and brought displeasure in the foreign capitals that preferred an inert, pliable Poland. Catherine, among the most displeased by Poniatowski's independence, encouraged religious dissension in Poland-Lithuania's substantial Eastern Orthodox population, which earlier in the eighteenth century had lost the rights enjoyed during the Jagiellon Dynasty. Under heavy Russian pressure, the Sejm restored Orthodox equality in 1767. This action provoked a Catholic uprising by the Confederation of Bar, a league of Polish nobles that fought until 1772 to revoke Catherine's mandate.

    The defeat of the Confederation of Bar again left Poland exposed to the ambitions of its neighbors. Although Catherine initially opposed partition, Frederick the Great of Prussia profited from Austria's threatening military position to the southwest by pressing a long-standing proposal to carve territory from the commonwealth. Catherine, persuaded that Russia did not have the resources to continue unilateral domination of Poland, agreed. In 1772 Russia, Prussia, and Austria forced terms of partition upon the helpless commonwealth under the pretext of restoring order in the anarchic Polish situation (see fig. 5).

    Data as of October 1992


    NOTE: The information regarding Poland on this page is re-published from The Library of Congress Country Studies. No claims are made regarding the accuracy of Poland The Three Partitions, 1764-95 information contained here. All suggestions for corrections of any errors about Poland The Three Partitions, 1764-95 should be addressed to the Library of Congress.

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    http://workmall.com/wfb2001/poland/poland_history_the_three_partitions_1764_95.html

    Revised 04-Jul-02
    Copyright © 2001 Photius Coutsoukis (all rights reserved)


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